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QUOTE ("BlackBarron":1je69lgl)
I just got a new 07 foreman 500 4x4, and i was wondering what it the best way to break in the motor. thanks
Congrats on getting the new Foreman! Where you able to get a deal you were happy with at your local dealer?

Concerning break-in just drive it at varied RPMs and speeds for a while. As long as you aren't boucing off the rev limiter and/or running at a steady constant speed for extented time you will be fine.
 

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I took it really easy on mine for the first 20 hours.Vary the speed up and down.I didn't pull anything or go full throttle during that time.I don't know if it makes any difference because I know guys who take a brand new machine and right away they have to see how fast it will go and see what it will pull,and they haven't had problems.
 

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I know people say to take it easy on motor with break-in period. I have owned 7 atv's since 01 and have taken it easy on only one. This was my 400 Kodiak, that was the only motor that has ever started smoking on me. All the others I ride 'em like I stole them for the first 25mi, change oil filter (it will be full of shavings) and everything has been perfect. I change to synthetic at around 200-250mi (after rings have seated) and they have all purred when sold at around 1200-1600 miles. These have been Honda's and Suzuki and Kawasaki (Cat's).
 

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The way I have always known to break in any engine is a little different. I find a smooth long slight incline, my driveway is perfect, and I make several runs up and down thru all the gears. The idea is to work the engine, make it pull a little. When you go up a slight incline it works the engine just a little harder than level ground. What this will do is push the rings tighter against the cylinder walls. Your true break-in of the engine will happen the first 20 minutes of riding. Don't wait for 20 hrs like they say. After about 2-3 hours change the oil, then again at the 20hr first service time. I done this with my foreman, it now has 3,100 miles on it, and did this way on my wifes BF650
 

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The way I have always known to break in any engine is a little different. I find a smooth long slight incline, my driveway is perfect, and I make several runs up and down thru all the gears. The idea is to work the engine, make it pull a little. When you go up a slight incline it works the engine just a little harder than level ground. What this will do is push the rings tighter against the cylinder walls. Your true break-in of the engine will happen the first 20 minutes of riding. Don't wait for 20 hrs like they say. After about 2-3 hours change the oil, then again at the 20hr first service time. I done this with my foreman, it now has 3,100 miles on it, and did this way on my wifes BF650
 

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just break it in like you are going to ride it........ my bike was snorkled and had 28's on it before i ever took it out and havent had any problems with the motor................ everyone has their opinion though on the break in
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
i just let it warm up, rode it around not going over 1/4 rpm and rode it for about 15 minutes and then i let it cool down, then i did the same thing only 1/2 rpm, then again a 3/4 rpm, and last i would run it to full rpm a couple of times and then i let it cool. Changed the oil and now im ready to go.
 

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The first day I rode mine I beat tyhe piss out of it and got it stuck and stuff.....1500miles later still holding strong! It may **** out on me today but that just means when it rolls out of the shop it will be badder! Basically break it in like your gunna ride it! If you baby it and then beat the piss out of it, it will break!
 

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Proper break in really isn't a matter of opinion. If you rag on the bike right away you can bet it will reduce the life. Just because some of you did it and the bike is still going strong is a testament to Honda engineering, not your break in (or lack thereof) technique.
 

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Well i might as well toss in my .02 cents .... The whole idea ,, hence the term "break in " is to do exactely that , with out breaking stuff .. seating the rings ..and valves is most important , Honda goes through every bike as if it is heading into outer space !!! But just running the motor throughout the working range , applieing loads and try to be constanly variable while doing this which could be going up and down hills diff gears etc
some goods straight runs ... for a good half a tank of gas , then go alittle more extreme last half of ur tank , do some crusing etc .. then change your oil and get into good maintence habits . and that bike should should last for years Also read throughout this site .. do some searches ur find some really great tips
 

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QUOTE ("TN Hillbilly":2jb44np7)
Proper break in really isn't a matter of opinion. If you rag on the bike right away you can bet it will reduce the life. Just because some of you did it and the bike is still going strong is a testament to Honda engineering, not your break in (or lack thereof) technique.
Where's your proof. My proof is 7 machines and only one problem, the one I babied at break in. I will find and post an interesting article for ya tomorrow. Good Luck
 

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QUOTE ("doneking":3gsuzncr)
Here's a very interesting article that may just change some minds on how to break-in a new engine.

This may be the one he is referring too.


http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm



DK
Very good article find DK! This is exactly the way I broke my engine in. I done tons of research on the subject and this is not the only one that says this way is the best. I found numerous sites, mostly engine biulders for sportbikes and dirtbikes, atv's etc. They all have the same test results. To shorten some, basically you want to keep a "load" on the piston rings to create a tighter seal and "hone" the rings to exactly fit the cylinder wall.
 

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How many millions of dollars do you think Honda has put into their R&D programs to come up with the best answer to this question? Why would people second guess the engineers who designed and tested these engines with a budget of millions of dollars? Doesn't Honda have to back up the warranties on these machines? Do you think they would give recommendations that would shorten engine life? Would that go hand in hand with Honda's biggest selling point, reliability? Of course not. As a mechanical engineer who designs custom factory manufacturing machines, I have to say there is nothing that pisses me off more than to get called into a plant to look at a problem with one of my machines, only to discover that THEY WEREN'T DOING WHAT I INSTRUCTED THEM TO DO IN THE FIRST PLACE. No one knows a machine better than the people who designed and tested it, and that's a fact. Joe Blow in the hot rod shop thinks he knows better than Honda? Does that make sense to you?

Hillbilly
 

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You have a very good point TN. The break in procedure that Honda calls for has nothing wrong with it and works great. This topic could go so many different ways! Basically what I would suggest to everyone is if you have any doubts, just do it the way Honda calls. It will work fine.

By the way, What kind of machines do you build TN H?
 

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I primarily do work for auto part manufacturers. For instance, I designed the machine which does the final assembly and leak test for the headlight assemblies on the 2008 Ford F-250 (Visteon), and the machine which is building the current throttle bodies for GM V-8's and V-6's (Hitachi). I also have a good customer here which manufactures ordnance for the army, so I've recently designed a couple of lines which build shoulder fired grenade shells. I also have a niche where I design and build machine enclosures for machines which employ high powered lasers for welding,cutting, heat treat, etc. Laser applications have special guarding requirements, and there aren't many firms which build them. I've never designed an engine, so I don't claim to have professional credentials in that field, but I'm intimately familiar with the tremendous amount of money todays manufacturers spend on quality checks and quality control. For instance the throttle body machine does a lot of automated measuring to make sure the machine is building the parts correctly. That's why I say that if Honda made the machine we should all listen to what they have to say about the best way to do things.
 
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