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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My buddy has an 06 rincon 680, and when we are riding, he will go to give it gas and it will crap out. if he turns it off for a few seco nds, it will start back up and run like a scalded ape again. the dealer has no idea why it is doing this and they have had it for about two months off and on. any ideas?
 

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QUOTE ("cgannttu":2ub3xq67)
My buddy has an 06 rincon 680, and when we are riding, he will go to give it gas and it will crap out. if he turns it off for a few seco nds, it will start back up and run like a scalded ape again. the dealer has no idea why it is doing this and they have had it for about two months off and on. any ideas?
Fuel quality, restricted fuel breather hose, pinched or clogged fuel delivery hose, faulty injector.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
it does not happen all the time, it is just every now and then. do you think o ne of those is more possible than the other. it seems to be pretty random.
 

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QUOTE ("cgannttu":l2wduohx)
it does not happen all the time, it is just every now and then. do you think o ne of those is more possible than the other. it seems to be pretty random.
Sounded like it was a fuel delivery problem as a function of the rate of use. Meaning sustained use, or high rate of use for a shorter period... that sort of thing.

If he knows the fuel is good, no water, no mix with something else, no "old fuel" kind of thing, and he knows the breather cap is clear, and the cap is snugged on properly... that leaves the other things. Forgot to include the fuel filter on that list.

Think in terms of the fuel path, something restricting it. Or finally the fuel delivery through the injector.

So is it random, or a function of the rate of use?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
yeah, they hooked it up and came up with nothing. they have been working with Honda techs over the phone. Honda is supposed to send somebody down to the dealer to take a look at it. it is just annoying that he has not even had it for 9 mos, and two of those have been at the shop. he is about ready to ask for a new one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The last time it did it, we were riding on trails with our wives, so kinda easy, and when we got to the bottom of a hill, he hit it to go up the hill and it wouldn't go. tried it a few more times and finally turned it off, started it back up and it ran fine the rest of the day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I will do that, we picked it up today and we are going to ride tomorrow, so we will see if it does it again. The dealer still has no idea how to fix it, but the district guy over the service said that the dealer had the authority to take a new bike and start replacing parts on his until it is fixed. his suggestion was to just give him the new bike. we'll see how it goes tomorrow.
 

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QUOTE ("cgannttu":1wpj39nq)
yeah, they hooked it up and came up with nothing. they have been working with Honda techs over the phone. Honda is supposed to send somebody down to the dealer to take a look at it. it is just annoying that he has not even had it for 9 mos, and two of those have been at the shop. he is about ready to ask for a new one.
The one concern I've had with the recent trend of making ATV's as complex as vehicle designs is that very complexity.

They may be more efficient with less emissions, and work well as long as all is right, but sensors, switches and connectors are the most likely thing to fail. The more of them there are are, the greater the chance of failure.

With higher complexity, and a greater chance of failure of a $2 part, diagnosis becomes ever more important.

This is clear with the automobile. The 80's vehicles are generally simple to fix, and can be easily sorted out by the DIY crowd.

The 90's vehicles saw a tremendous increase in complexity aimed at meeting emmissions and efficiency standards.

With OBDII, came the availability of improved diagnostic tools which can be used by the DIY crowd, a big help with sorting out the increased complexity.

Point is, forcing the ATV to use all that higher complexity in an off-road vehicle that averages a few thousand hours of use in its lifetime, is highly questionable.

But given this "strategy", the next best thing would be diagnostic tools for the owner, much like we have in the automobile world.

Without them, we are somewhat at the mercy of the dealer, and the manufacturer.

The only saving grace is that Honda makes good stuff, most of the time.

Digression off.... soap off.
 

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QUOTE ("rdharper")
QUOTE ("cgannttu")
yeah, they hooked it up and came up with nothing. they have been working with Honda techs over the phone. Honda is supposed to send somebody down to the dealer to take a look at it. it is just annoying that he has not even had it for 9 mos, and two of those have been at the shop. he is about ready to ask for a new one.
The one concern I've had with the recent trend of making ATV's as complex as vehicle designs is that very complexity.

They may be more efficient with less emissions, and work well as long as all is right, but sensors, switches and connectors are the most likely thing to fail. The more of them there are are, the greater the chance of failure.

With higher complexity, and a greater chance of failure of a $2 part, diagnosis becomes ever more important.

This is clear with the automobile. The 80's vehicles are generally simple to fix, and can be easily sorted out by the DIY crowd.

The 90's vehicles saw a tremendous increase in complexity aimed at meeting emmissions and efficiency standards.

With OBDII, came the availability of improved diagnostic tools which can be used by the DIY crowd, a big help with sorting out the increased complexity.

Point is, forcing the ATV to use all that higher complexity in an off-road vehicle that averages a few thousand hours of use in its lifetime, is highly questionable.

But given this "strategy", the next best thing would be diagnostic tools for the owner, much like we have in the automobile world.

Without them, we are somewhat at the mercy of the dealer, and the manufacturer.

The only saving grace is that Honda makes good stuff, most of the time.

Digression off.... soap off.[/quote]


RDHARPER hit the nail on the head, remember the old saying KISS (keep it simple stupid). That's why I'll take my FOREMAN 500S over these new machines any day.
 
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